Rabid Reader’s Book List for Human Rights Day 2017

This year again, Rabid Reader’s Reviews presents a list of books dealing with human rights. In light of the events, human rights violations have increased and become a pressing issue worldwide.

 

To Live Out Loud: A Novel by Paulette Mahurin

Review quotes:

“There’s an electricity of fear and suspicion in the people. It was believed that Dreyfus would be a traitor because he was a Jew.”

“To Live Out Loud is an outstanding work of historical fiction and a must-read for everyone, especially those interested in the history of human rights violations.” 

Read the complete To Live Out Loud: A Novel by Paulette Mahurin review here.

 

Stonewall: The Riots that sparked the Gay Revolution

Stonewall: The Riots That Sparked the Gay Revolution by David Carter

Review quotes:

“What is revealed is a deeply complex story steeped in the underworld and the use of gay culture as a money-making endeavor via blackmail.”

“There are no unnecessary dramatizations. The sourced information and interviews stand on their own as a poignant testament to a people who were done with being stepped on at a whim and were ready to stand and be who they are.”

“At a weighty 349 pages, Stonewall: The Riots That Sparked the Gay Revolution is an investment, and it’s an important read for anyone interested in the Human Rights Movement.”

Read the complete Stonewall: The Riots That Sparked the Gay Revolution by David Carter review here.

 

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Review quotes:

“The story of Henrietta Lacks is an important one. Her cells were harvested to make advancements in science and henceforward the health of humanity.”

“The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a must read for people interested in the racial politics of the medical world in the 1050s, the science of genetic research and the question of ethics of personal rights vs. the greater good. Pick it up this Human Rights Day and find out more about the most famous unknown woman in scientific research.”

Read the complete The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot review here.

 

Friedrich Dürrenmatt The Physicists play

The Physicists by Friedrich Dürrenmatt

Review quotes:

“In Möbius we find a scientist who is concerned about his discovery and tries to take a responsible ethic approach because he distrusts governments and society in so far as to do the right thing. And he is not wrong.”

“The now-permanent coalition of the military and mass industry Eisenhower observed, was at that point predictable. It is debatable that military-industrial complex exists for the purpose of being ready for war at all times can lead to a situation in which even peace implies a state of war.”

Read the complete The Physicists by Friedrich Dürrenmatt review here.

 

Twelve Days in May by Larry Brimner

Twelve Days in May: Freedom Ride 1961

Review quotes:

“Twelve Days In May: Freedom Ride 1961 is a faultless accounting of an important event in history. The layout of the books makes it appropriate and easily accessible for all ages to delve into the heroes who rose above the inhumanity of history.”

Brimner’s Twelve Days In May: Freedom Ride 1961 is a must read for all Americans. If you have someone who is interested in Civil Rights on your holiday gift-list, be sure to pick up this beautifully formatted book for them or, perhaps, treat yourself.”

Read the complete Twelve Days in May: Freedom Ride 1961 review here.

For more books dealing with human rights and human rights violations, check out our last year’s Rabid Reader’s Book List for Human Rights Day 2016.

 

To Live Out Loud: A Novel by Paulette Mahurin

Publication Date: July 28, 2015

 

To Live out Loud by Paulette Mahurin, historical fiction book review by Rabid Reader's ReviewsIn 1894 Captain Richard Dreyfus, a French Artillery Officer was convicted of treason for passing military secrets to the Germans. Dreyfus was sent to Devil’s Island in French Guiana to live out his sentence. When a few years later evidence that Dreyfus was innocent was discovered, the French military did everything they could to suppress the information. French journalist, Emile Zola, ran with the story of the gross injustice in the periodical J’Accuse and became a target of those looking to keep the story under wraps and Dreyfus incarcerated. To Live Out Loud is the story of this historic case and Zola’s coverage of it and the ultimate pursuit of justice at all costs.

 

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Knoll: The Last JFK Conspiracist by Stephen Hillard

Publication Date: June 6, 2017

 

As lawyer Bus McIntyre digs into the past of his murdered father, he uncovers a dangerous secret. At the same time, a protege of Edward Snowdon discovers that a project purporting to look for new information in the assassination of JFK is actually identifying people with new information and eliminating them. Is Bus the next victim?

 

 

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My 21 Years in the White House by Alonzo Fields

Publication Date: February 16, 2016

 

My 21 Years in the White House by Alonzo Fields, autobiography book reviewAlonzo Fields started working in the White House in 1931 and was the head butler for the four Presidents – Hoover, Roosevelt, Truman and Eisenhower. My 21 Years in the White House is a look through the eyes of a man keenly aware of the unique position he held and with nearly unlimited access at crucial points in U.S. history and his encounters with the world leaders that visited.

 

 

 

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Rabid Reader’s Book List for Human Rights Day 2016

If you are looking for books dealing with human rights, check out those that have been reviewed on this homepage. Our main post with an overview of books and movies were reviewed for human rights day 2016 will be published later. At the moment, enjoy the Rabid Reader’s Book List for Human Rights Day 2016 and make sure to visit this site later.

 

Contempt of Court: The Turn-of-the-Century Lynching That Launched a Hundred Years of Federalism by Mark Curriden & Leroy Phillips

Genre: nonfiction, human rights, political science, African-American studies

In 1906, a white woman was brutally raped in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Ed Johnson, a black man, was working at his restaurant job when the attack happened but was arrested and charged with the crime. When his lawyers appealed to the Supreme Court for a stay of execution and that stay was granted, local folks, led by officials, took the law into their own hands. In a history-changing move, the lynch mob faced federal legal repercussions. Ed  Johnson cleared of the rape charges 100 years later. You can read the review of a “Contempt of Court” here.

Continue reading Rabid Reader’s Book List for Human Rights Day 2016

Accidental Death of an Anarchist by Dario Fo

Publication Date: March 12, 1987

 

do_accidental_death_of_an_anarchist

Accidental Death of an Anarchist (Morte accidentale di un anarchico) was written by the Italian playwright, Dario Fo, following the events that took place in Italy, in the late 1960s. Fo is one of Italy’s most important and well-known literary writers who is famous for employing satire and popular elements within his work. His writings deal with Italian politics and his work is able to attract people from all walks of life.

The book was released in 1970 and the play was first performed in Milan in December of the same year. In 1984, it was staged on Broadway and became Fo’s most popular work inside and outside of Italy. For theater directors, this has been the play of choice when it comes to dealing with corruption.

 

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The Murder Business: How the Media Turns Crime Into Entertainment and Subverts Justice by Mark Fuhrman

Publication Date: October 12, 2009

 

mf_the_murder_business

In The Murder Business, former LAPD Detective turned author, Mark Fuhrman, examines how media sensationalism of criminal cases and the reckless nature with which they’re treated publicly impedes the course of justice.

 

 

 

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Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1968)

Release Date: January 24, 1968 | DVD Release Date: February 27, 2001

 

DVD_Dr_StrangeloveA United States Air Force General orders a nuclear attack aimed at the Soviet Union. The movie follows the President and Joint Chiefs of Staff as they struggle to stop the attack and the B-52 Bomber as it travels to deliver the devastating hit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1968)

Contempt of Court: The Turn-of-the-Century Lynching That Launched a Hundred Years of Federalism by Mark Curriden & Leroy Phillips

Reprint Edition: February 20, 2001

 

MC_Contempt_of_Court

In 1906, a white woman was brutally raped in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Ed Johnson, a black man, was working at his restaurant job when the attack happened but was arrested and charged with the crime. When his lawyers appealed to the Supreme Court for a stay of execution and that stay was granted, local folks, led by officials, took the law into their own hands. In a history-changing move, the lynch mob faced federal legal repercussions.

 

Continue reading Contempt of Court: The Turn-of-the-Century Lynching That Launched a Hundred Years of Federalism by Mark Curriden & Leroy Phillips

The Dragon and the Needle by Hugh Franks

Publication Date: May 7, 2014

 

HF_Dragon_and_NeedleExtraordinary Natural Death Syndrome (ENDS) is killing celebrities and people of note. When Dr. Mike Clifford and Eleanor Johnson, a noted Chinese trained acupuncturist, start investigating the disease they  discover that the cause may be more sinister than they ever imagined.

 

 

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