Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks

Publication Date: September 9, 2014

 

17910171Bertie Wooster is an expert of the “country pile” but has never seen it from the perspective of the servant’s quarters. In order to help Woody woo the love of his life, Jeeves posts as an obscure lord of the realm while Bertie is his personal gentleman. Will Woody convince his ladylove he’s worth a shot? Can Bertie serve Jeeves undetected by fellow servants and the lord of the manor?

 

 

Back in the 1990s when I worked at the Ann Arbor District Library and took the bus to work, I went through a phase where I’d read the biography of an author and then everything they’d written available through the library. P.G. Wodehouse was one of those authors that the more I read, the more I wanted to read. I loved the simplicity and innocence of young Wooster and his guardian, the suave gentleman’s gentleman, Jeeves. In [easyazon_link identifier=”1250049067″ locale=”US” tag=”rabidreaders-20″]Jeeves and the Wedding Bells[/easyazon_link], Sebastian Faulks honors the legacy of Wodehouse with exquisite skill. This author is truly a Wodehouse scholar and [easyazon_link identifier=”1250049067″ locale=”US” tag=”rabidreaders-20″]Jeeves and the Wedding Bells,[/easyazon_link] is his love letter to the late author.

Bertie meets the divine Georgina while on vacation in the south of France. They’re best of friends, have a great time together and the attraction apparent. They part ways at the end of their vacation, as Georgina is the hope of her guardians to save their “country pile” from becoming a boy’s school. Georgina’s cousin is Woody’s beloved and she’s a jealous young thing, unwilling to understand the popularity with local ladies of a young chap. The idea of Jeeves involvement is to distract the love interest’s social climbing father. If you’re thinking the plot is somewhat rambling, this is in keeping with the Wodehouse style. Comic adventures are the order of the day while tight plots are something just not done.

The charm of Bertie’s unique patter is played to perfection in “Jeeves and the Wedding Bells.” As the ultimate frat boy of his era, he is wholly confident and completely willing to bluff his way through anything. He is good-natured in his deception and when calling friends to help with a lie, he is unabashedly open with them. He is doing for Woody what he would do for any of them and they know it. Also, they can’t resist seeing Bertie in his serving position at which they suspect he’s a happy failure.

Jeeves is perhaps more off-screen in [easyazon_link identifier=”1250049067″ locale=”US” tag=”rabidreaders-20″]Jeeves and the Wedding Bells[/easyazon_link] than he is in other works of the series. Bertie calls to Jeeves for guidance and advice. Jeeves, as per usual, is the even voice of reason missing few tricks. He gives Bertie guidance so that he fits seamlessly into life below stairs. Of course, the story needs hiccups and Faulks provides them in a classic style. [easyazon_link identifier=”1250049067″ locale=”US” tag=”rabidreaders-20″]Jeeves and the Wedding Bells[/easyazon_link] is no imitation. It is truly original fitting into the Jeeves and Wooster tradition.

[easyazon_link identifier=”1250049067″ locale=”US” tag=”rabidreaders-20″]Jeeves and the Wedding Bells[/easyazon_link] is a delightfully light Friday Read. If you love Wodehouse or light fiction like I do, [easyazon_link identifier=”1250049067″ locale=”US” tag=”rabidreaders-20″]Jeeves and the Wedding Bells[/easyazon_link] is a novel not to be missed. More than a homage to the author Wodehouse, it is an honor to his legacy and lasting influence. Pick it up today.

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For more information about Sebastian Faulks, visit his website. You can connect with him on Goodreads, Facebook and Twitter @SebastianFaulks.

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