The Scarecrow’s Brane by D.L. Morrese

Publication Date: July 3, 2015

 

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Commander Lisa Chang and the crew of the Brane Child find themselves in Oddz. Their ship crash-lands into the only thing between the Emerald City and the Red Witch of the South, who is trying to take it over. Lisa must travel to the Great and Powerful Blue Wizards of the East to make a new weapon to protect the Emerald City.

The Scarecrow’s Brane: A Futuristic Fairy Tale (Adventures of the Brane Child Book 2) is the second book in the Brane Child series.

 

The author, David Morrese, gave me a copy of this book in exchange for my review.

The Scarecrow’s Brane: A Futuristic Fairy Tale (Adventures of the Brane Child Book 2) picks up where the first novel in the series leaves off. The ship is caught in a storm and careens toward the ground. In Oddz, Morrese creates a familiar and yet a unique world much darker than readers might expect but no less satisfying. The crew is starting to understand more about where they go, how they’re will be getting there and they must manage events in the lightly familiar environment when they arrive. The lightly familiar environment allows crossover from other worlds that works as Easter eggs in the story.

The Red Witch of the South is a fabulous character. Good, in her case, is subjective. She has the monkeys and is taking over the Emerald City but sees it as part of a routine. She attacks, the citizens fight back and everyone is happy. She’s not evil but simply playing her part in some grand scheme. The Red Witch makes some socially relevant observations that are timely, in this reader’s opinion, about politics and the way the masses approach conflict, candidates and elected officials. She sees the good and right thing to do as saving the citizens of Emerald City from their elected officials and themselves. On page 78, a character says that all of the good witches are “insufferable.” The Red Witch is earnest, straightforward and a great addition to the story.

Lisa and her crew embark on an adventure that takes them on a grand mission in an incredibly complex world. While built on the foundation of an already established world, Morrese’s Oddz is a wholly unique place that presents a true danger to the crew. Morrese’s skill of craftsmanship shines in ‘The Scarecrows Brane.” From talking frogs looking for a princess to a run-through from Alice and a rabbit named Harvey, each layer builds the story that is delightfully entertaining if quite dark. Perhaps Doc says it best when he points out that Munchkinland isn’t “THE Munchkinland but A Munchkinland.” The story is wholly Morrese and fittingly dedicated to the late Terry Pratchett as there’s some tone of an influence of the late great author in the wonderful absurdity of it all.

In keeping with Morrese’s usual quality level, The Scarecrow’s Brane: A Futuristic Fairy Tale (Adventures of the Brane Child Book 2) is expertly edited. The flow is smooth and fast. It is helpful to have read the first book before reading the second but it is not necessary. On its own, the story is self-standing and readers may be a bit confused about how Brane Child came to be but the story is complete within itself. The Scarecrow’s Brane: A Futuristic Fairy Tale (Adventures of the Brane Child Book 2) is a story that readers won’t want to put down until it’s done. If you’re looking for a great way to spend an afternoon, pick The Scarecrow’s Brane: A Futuristic Fairy Tale (Adventures of the Brane Child Book 2) up today.

Read an excerpt and pick up The Scarecrow’s Brane: A Futuristic Fairy Tale (Adventures of the Brane Child Book 2) by D.L. Morrese today on:

Amazon U.S.Amazon U.K.Amazon Canada

The first book of the series, Brane Child has also been reviewed on this blog.

D.L. Morrese is a Florida based, full-time author. His book The Warden Threat received the Awesome Indie Seal of Approval for Excellence in Fiction and the Indie Book of the Day Award. Check out the reviews of The Warden Threat as well as Amy’s Pendant, Disturbing Clock and An Android’s Tale.

For more information about D.L. Morrese and his work, visit his website. You can connect with D.L. Morrese on Goodreads, Facebook and Twitter @DLMorrese. Series readers can track his books on FictFact.

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