An Eye for An Eye for An Eye by Marc Nash

Publication Date: September 28, 2013

 

[easyazon-image align=”left” asin=”B00FIP9TEU” locale=”us” height=”160″ src=”http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51TEHXp%2BBqL._SL160_.jpg” width=”100″]In a slightly alternate universe, Simon Morlee has a gift. He shares an intimacy with the dead far greater than any that could be shared in life. He can see the last few things they saw before death. The police force is down to a skeleton crew relying on Simon to bring in the bad guys. When a serial killer with his own special talent hits the scene will Simon be facing the end of his journey?

 

The author, Marc Nash, gave me a copy of this novel in exchange for my review.

 

At the start of An Eye For An Eye For An Eye, I was deeply confused. The language of the piece seemed designed for impact and left this reader a little lost. What I’d thought the book was about, and the scenes unfolding before me were not the same. Reading on, all became clear and the stage was set for a world a little darker than our own and a tortured soul on whom all responsibility lies. Each word seemed carefully considered and arranged so that the language of the story became a living piece. Nash describes a very large man getting out of a very small car and the image brought forward is less Krusty, and friends running from a car that was hit on “The Simpsons” to something menacing. The instant warning that despite the incongruous nature of the event, this is not a dude to be messed with. Descriptions are done carefully and with a through economy of words. After setting the scene in elaborate detail, Nash introduces us to a man who is deeply important to his society by virtue of an uncommon and somewhat horrifying gift. The sort of gift that makes the reader wonder how the character manages not to take his own life. Nash’s world reminds me of the “Watchman” graphic novels. His carefully crafted society is bleak and waiting for the hero that will likely never come. The true goal is to keep the bad elements of the world from getting worse. Is it wrong to experience a delicious thrill when the reader realizes that things can’t help but get worse when the baddie has a supernatural ability that makes him pretty darn close to unstoppable?

Simon Morlee, the protagonist in An Eye For An Eye For An Eye is a fascinating guy. He’s developed thorough introspection. Simon is a deeply philosophical man who views his gift as an obligation. He quickly flips through, like the pages of a book, to view the last things a person saw. To linger would be to experience the terror but his obligation locks him into wanting every line in a person’s face recorded so that the right bad guys can be found. Simon views the perfect portrayal on paper of the killer as freeing that image from his mind.

An Eye For An Eye For An Eye is a police procedural with a twist. Authors tell me frequently when sending books for review that their novel is like nothing I’ve ever read before. I read a lot so the end result is often that they may have a twist but overall the story is pretty familiar. Nash’s story is unique. I would love to see this character in a series on television. I think the whole premise would make for a fabulous show. Nash’s writing style is quite visual so it’s easy to see this story translating fluidly to the screen.

I loved An Eye For An Eye For An Eye. If you like mystery and police procedural or like your reading a little dark, pick this one up today.

If this sounds like a book for you, you can order it from Amazon.com by clicking the title anywhere in this review. Links for Amazon.ca and Amazon.co.uk appear below:

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For more information on Marc Nash and his work visit his blogs Sulici Collective and MarcNash.lit.

Marc Nash talks about his book “An Eye for An Eye for An Eye” on You Tube.

Find Marc Nash and his books on Goodreads and Twitter @21stCscribe.